Friday, April 9, 2010

My Thoughts On A Sad Tragedy.........

Most of you know that I grew up in the same coal fields as those killed in that horrible disaster in southern WV. My brother actually worked with one of those men. My heart breaks for the families of those that have lost loved ones and I know that the entire community for each grieves. Miners are a close knit brotherhood, much like firemen or policemen...They know the dangers that lie inside a mountain of coal each time they go underground, just like a firemen knows a building is burning, he doesn't let that stop him, he proudly does his job....


I know what it's like to wait by a phone when you've heard of an accident and I know what its like to meet a ambulance at the Emergency Room, hoping for the best...My Grandfathers were coal miners, my Daddy was a coal miner, so are my brothers, and numerous family members....I remember when I was a teenager and Daddy would talk about how high the mine was...24 inches...I couldn't image working for 8-12 hours Monday-Saturday in the dark in 24 inches (that's the height of a coffee table), you eat in that, go to the bathroom in that and work hard in that, you don't come out until your shift is over....A lot of people around here (Atlanta) always ask me why people live that kind of life...it's simple...It's a way of life in Appalachia, a way to support your family and the only thing that most know. And one they take a great deal of pride in.. There's an old saying "When a boy becomes a man, slap a shovel in his hands"....


I'm proud of my mining heritage, when I was a little girl I thought every bodies Daddy was a coal miner...I spoke to my family yesterday, they were telling me about the protesters standing only a few yards away from the families awaiting news of loved, environmentalist holding signs that said things like, "Let them burn"...Fools that don't realize without people like these who risk their life everyday they wouldn't be able to flip a switch and have electricity at night....This broke my Daddy's heart...When I drive home to visit my family, the last two hours of the trip are filled with me passing coal mine after coal mine...When I start seeing those mines I get my second wind...Because after a long drive, I know I'm almost home...It's sad that protesters used that as their opportunity, and wanted to stand next to family with those horrible signs...As for me, I will mourn the loss of these men and keep their families in my prayers. Such a sad tragedy indeed....









8 comments:

ClassyChassy said...

Thanks for a close-up picture of what it must be like to work in a mine, to be among those waiting for news and hope - a tragedy to loose someone you love in a horrid way. I've thought of those families often, and pray for them.

Chatty Crone said...

I have to admit - it is not something I think about very much - shame on me. Of course without these great men and women sacrificing for us - where would we be today?

Sandie

Linda said...

Thank you for this personal look into a horrible tragedy. My thoughts and prayers are with the miners and their families.

Andora said...

Very well said...My hubby is a strip miner,and I have family that are coal miners..and those protesters...well don't get me started on them....take care friend..

Susan said...

What a beautiful tribute. We are part of the Wild Land Firefighting "family". You have to rely on each other to all make it home after each fire. When a fellow Wild Land Firefighter dies, we all mourn. Thank you for sharing what's close to your heart.
Susan

septembermom said...

I can't imagine their grief and fear. Such a tragedy. Thanks for sharing your perspective.

LindainNCtoo said...

People don't know what life is like as a coal miner. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. I cannot imagine what goes through those families minds and hearts when they hear of an explosion underground.

I cry with them and pray for them.

Linda M.

Susan said...

I agree - it was a devastating tragedy, and whether one agrees or disagrees with coal mining, human charity must prevail. To protest next to mourning families is simply beyond the pale.Unbelievable!